Laughter and books make life a little easier

Burning [Creative Writing]

I’m writing! I’m writing! Can you believe that?! When last have I written anything that was not non-fiction? Yes, indeed it was during NaNoWriMo, more than four months ago. That should be the new officially warning for Wrimos: You may be drained from all writing for four months after the challenge. *evil laugh* Just when you have completely recovered, it will be time for the next challenge! Hoho!

Anyway, I’ll stop rambling about the wonder of writing and get to the story. This started off as a story of hope and then did a 180 degree turn and went in the other direction. Then things got a bit political and I suspect it is laughing at things one should not laugh at. Please note: it is not speaking about any specific country. You can apply it wherever you like… or see it as completely fictional dystopia if that is the way you prefer it.

I’m rather unsure about this story. I’m not sure if it’s too fragmentary, too vague, too horrible. Opinions, please! That’s what the comment box is for!

I present to you… Burning.

 

 

Burning

It is a terrible thing when a country burns. All the people and creatures get scalded and that is not a nice thing to get, after all. Most of the plants die as well, except for those who learn to feed on the liquid raining from the sky. This liquid is no refreshment, for it is not old-fashioned water, but hot oil raining from the sky – and it does more than just make everything slippery. It feeds the fires burning in the earth and it banishes the water. Those two have an ancient feud, you know. In fact, both would have had massive chips on their shoulders if only they had chips. Or shoulders, for that matter.

Some of the people of the country fled before it all started. They were the most foresighted – or perhaps the most cowardly. Who knows? The foolishly heroic who remain behind roam the stricken countryside in packs. There are still a few areas where one can survive, where the wind-patterns turn away most of the oil-clouds. However, ferocious fights break out on the smallest patch of grass, over said patch of grass, of course. When it is done, not much grass is left. It is easy to start a fight in these days. Without society’s restraints, even a look can serve as catalyst. Luckily for the fights, there are not many looks: people prefer not to look at each other too much, no one being much of an oil painting what with all the oil, ash and smoke around.

What else is left in the country? In fact, what is there left for a burning country? There isn’t much feeling: neither mirth nor maudlin. Things just are, without any kind of descriptive adjective. People and creatures still draw breath and just about the most you can hope for is not getting burned today.

There is not much else to say about the burning country. Usually it is as silent as a mausoleum – which is more than a simile. Sometimes you can hear the laughter of hyenas echoing across the plains. But then, those things will mock anything before they tear it apart – alive.

 

PS. Random fun fact: This is my 50th blog post! Yay!


© 2012. Elana E. All rights reserved.

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8 responses

  1. Good one!

    April 20, 2012 at 13:35

    • Thank you! 😀

      April 20, 2012 at 21:10

  2. It’s not horrible. You could turn it into a wonderful essay by explaining other details or adding up something about the historical fire in 1666.

    April 20, 2012 at 18:11

    • Seeing that I had to look up “1666 fire”, thinking I’d never heard of it, before realising I actually did know it, it was probably not that on my mind as I was writing. 😉 But interpret it any way you wish!
      I could probably expand it, yes. Maybe I could add some plot. Hmm… that’s an idea…
      And thanks for saying it’s not horrible! 😀

      April 20, 2012 at 21:14

      • LOL! It’s not horrible. Just suggesting maybe you could explore and open up the burning theme, even from spontaneous combustion where people suddenly heat up and catch fire by themselves… 😀

        April 20, 2012 at 21:47

      • Hehehehe! 😉
        Ahaha! Now spontaneous combustion is interesting!

        April 20, 2012 at 22:33

  3. Congratulations on your 50 posts, continue to let the writing take you where it goes. Your description techniques remind of the great L. Frank Baum!
    “The foolishly heroic who remain behind roam the stricken countryside in packs. There are still a few areas where one can survive, where the wind-patterns turn away most of the oil-clouds. However, ferocious fights break out on the smallest patch of grass, over said patch of grass, of course. When it is done, not much grass is left. It is easy to start a fight in these days. Without society’s restraints, even a look can serve as catalyst. Luckily for the fights, there are not many looks: people prefer not to look at each other too much, no one being much of an oil painting what with all the oil, ash and smoke around.”
    In that paragraph, you really paint a vivid picture that sets up the scenery for what sounds like an interesting plot. Build on your description, it is a strength of yours. More importantly is your attitude towards writing and your audience. Like Baum, you understand the importance of your audience’s suggestions and opinions. You understand that what they have to say can very well bring your next writings to life, that they may stand the tests of time. I can sense your passion, and like the burning city in your story, let the fire rage on!

    April 22, 2012 at 18:14

    • Thank you for the lovely comment! 😀
      I’ve been told before that description is my strong point, but never been compared to Baum before. 😉
      Oh, I’d certainly at least take into consideration anything that someone comments – unless it’s an outright troll, of course… After all, you learn through people’s viewpoints on your writing.
      Whoops, I’d have to be careful not to get burnt! 😛

      April 22, 2012 at 21:04

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